Fireball Logo

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What is Fireball Logo

Back in the 80s, a unique alcoholic beverage has appeared when a barman tried to create a drink that would quickly warm up a person during cold winter days. Thanks to the company Sazerac, which received the unique rights to the production of Fireball, the drink with the name Fireball became famous all over the world. As of 2018, Fireball is among the top-selling whiskey brands in the United States. The drink was awarded a silver medal at the International Review of Spirits.

Meaning and History

Whiskey called Fireball has appeared for the first time in the 80s of the XX century. The harsh Canadian winter served as the reason for creating a unique drink. Those who have tried the original warming liquor claim that when drinking it, the person feels as if they are swallowing a fireball, which is where the name has come from.

What is Fireball?

Fireball is a name of an alcoholic beverage created by a Canadian barman back in the 80s. The Fireball trademark is owned by Sazerac, founded by Antoine Peychad. Currently, Fireball is widely available in Canada, the US, the UK, as well as in Singapore, Israel, Norway, Sweden, Germany, France, Australia, Ireland, and other countries.

???? – Today

Fireball Logo

It is not clear when the Fireball logo has appeared, but it has definitely become well associated with the famous whiskey. It features a red fire-breathing creature or a dragon. It has a big head relative to its body, clawed arms and legs, and a well-built body with a long tail. The dragon looks like it is jumping and his head is burning as well. The words “Red” and “Hot on either side of the creature along with the dragon itself well describe the spicy, burning sensation when drinking this whiskey. Creating an arch above the dragon, there is the name of the whiskey, Fireball, written in all capital letters in the Art Deco style. Below the creature, the logo has the word “Whisky”, which later was changed to “Cinnamon Whisky”, written in a smaller font.